Song: Honky-Tonk Villain

Download song: mp3 Ogg MIDI

After reading through archived comments I had on my last song (“Daybreak“), I found myself feeling a bit nostalgic – so I decided to make today’s song another oldy-but-goody.

Honky-Tonk Villain has a bit of a history behind it. I was originally commissioned to write this piece for a flash animation parody of the silent-film era. (I’ve scoured the web for the original flash file but can’t find it anywhere, sadly.) After finishing that project, I didn’t do much with this song – after all, it’s not exactly fitting for video game composing, which is what I mostly focus on.

However, while working on the same game project associated with the aforementioned “Daybreak,” I needed to come up with a character theme for a particularly bad-ass villain character (appropriately titled “The Dragon”). This bad-ass villain was actually based off one of the writers on the project (and a good friend of mine), so the intent was for me to really put together something befitting an evil mastermind.

You can imagine the response when I submitted this piece for consideration. To quote the writer/inspiration:

“This is so typical of the relationship between Tanner and I. He threw this in there because he knew I’d roll out of my chair laughing, and sure enough, I was bowling over by the second bar! I can picture him giggling like a little schoolgirl as he’s composing this piece with me in mind, and I’m giggling like a little schoolgirl (a huge, demented little schoolgirl, with a menthol burning between his fingers :p ) writing this review. I think this could work as my theme with a little adjustment. ;) This one gets a 9/10 just because of his sense of humor. :D”

(For the record, I did giggle like a schoolgirl upon submitting the piece.)

Anyway, thanks for indulging my momentary nostalgia – and be sure to think of a moustached villain in a cape tying an innocent woman to a set of train tracks while this song plays. Fitting, no?

Creative Commons License

"Honky-Tonk Villain" by Tanner Helland is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be obtained here.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

Song: Daybreak

Download song: mp3 Ogg FLAC MIDI

Way back when I first submitted this song to the video game team I was part of when I wrote it, I classified the genre as “Hoe-down…? Jig?! Barnyard dance?!?!”

That about sums it up.

Daybreak is the kind of song I’m glad I wrote, but I’ll never write another song like it. I’ve never been a big country music fan, so writing a fiddle jig was a bit outside my comfort zone.

I think a good summary of this song comes from one of the members of the original game project. After hearing this piece, he commented (slightly edited):

“Hoe down what? I’m not quite sure what square dances in america are like but this reminds me heavily of…well feck knows, but this is something real surprising from Tanner. Damn it’s catchy.

Also, that lead fiddle is real nasty sounding, DAMN. Any way of improving the sound of it would be greatly appreciated.”

Still makes me laugh. :)

On a final note, I got the original idea for this piece – strangely enough – from “Final Answer” by The Calling. I’m fairly certain no one on planet earth could have guessed that connection had I not mentioned it!

Creative Commons License

"Daybreak" by Tanner Helland is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be obtained here.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

Song: Syntheticity

Download song: mp3 Ogg MIDI

“Syntheticity” has gone through any number of name changes. It started out as “Technojazz”, then later became “Diridian Syndicate Theme” as part of a video game project. When that project went belly-up, the song ended up lost in an obscure folder on an old Windows XP hard drive.

When I finally stumbled across the piece while perusing old musical archives in search of music worth fixing up, I have to admit I was pretty excited to see “Syntheticity” again. The 80’s drum sound combined with a catchy electric piano line and a great slap bass were too vintage to pass up! I also decided against using any of the previous song titles, and instead settled on the excellent noun “syntheticity”. (It’s partially a real word.)

I’ve adjusted all of the soundfonts to more closely match my original idea for the piece (a retro-heavy town theme), so don’t be alarmed if the MIDI sounds quite different from the mp3 and ogg.

Creative Commons License

"Syntheticity" by Tanner Helland is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be obtained here.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

Song: Cyaron’s Gate

Download song: mp3 Ogg FLAC MIDI

“Cyaron’s Gate” will always hold a special place in my heart, since it was the first composition for which I won an actual award.  (1st Place, Audio Division: 2000 Utah State Multimedia Festival) As you can tell from that date, this piece was completed last century… a.k.a. 1999.

After a brief introduction, the first theme is introduced. Depending on your familiarity with Baroque music, you may notice a strange similarity to Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor.  (Please follow that link and listen to the original piece if you’re not familiar with it – it’s spectacular.)  I did indeed use Bach as inspiration for the first movement of this piece, though I imagine he’d heartily disagree with my use of a cheesy drumbeat alongside an otherwise nice melody.

Meh.  I always envisioned Bach as being kind of a prick, so I’m not too concerned with hurting his feelings.

After the Bach-ish theme, you’ll notice a pleasant middle bridge marked by an electric guitar (not sure why I picked that instrument, but I left it in the remaster since it’s been that way forever).  Once the second movement hits, you may notice its theme as “Remember,” another piece already available on this site.  “Remember” was originally written as the second half of “Cyaron’s Gate,” and it wasn’t until years later that I pulled that theme out and gave it its own piece.

I’ve tried to leave the instruments somewhat synthy so you can get a feel for how this piece sounded 10+ years ago when it was first written.

Creative Commons License

"Cyaron's Gate" by Tanner Helland is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be obtained here.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

Song: Deeper

Listen online:last.fm

Download song: mp3 Ogg FLAC MIDI

“Deeper” is a new type of music for me – a techno dungeon theme with a bunch of cool non-MIDI sounds. Exciting, right?

As you’ve probably guessed, “Deeper” has been designed as background music (meant to have narration over the top of it), which explains the largely benign instrument choices. Also of note is that I’ve had no choice but to cut down the MIDI track because the mp3/ogg versions use some unorthodox instruments that don’t translate into MIDI. (Listen for the low gong in the first few seconds, as one example.)

Something else I’m excited about is that “Deeper” uses an all-new guitar soundfont, which I think works well in this context. It’s quite grungy, and I think it melds nicely with the heavy synth instrumentation.

To give you a feel for the thematic setting of this piece, think of a sci-fi hero quietly sneaking through an alien lair. When the music escalates, the hero makes a run for it after being detected by his otherwordly enemies…

Creative Commons License

"Deeper" by Tanner Helland is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be obtained here.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

One New Song, Three “Remasters”

First, direct links to the three remastered songs:

Alagaesia and Eragon (Piano Solo) – MIDI (15kb)

Alagaesia and Eragon (Piano Solo) – mp3 (8.1mb)

Alagaesia and Eragon (Piano Solo) – ogg (5.7mb)

A Memory Away – MIDI (10kb)

A Memory Away – mp3 (3.9mb)

A Memory Away – ogg (3.4mb)

Clowns – MIDI (15kb)

Clowns – mp3 (2.5mb)

Clowns – ogg (2.0mb)

And something quite rare – an entirely new, never-before-published track. Woohoo!

Deeper – MIDI (27kb)

Deeper – mp3 (7.7mb)

Deeper – ogg (6.7mb)

“Deeper” is an experimental track for an unannounced project. Sorry I can’t be more specific than that. :)

So what can I say about it?

Well, I can say that it has been designed as background music (meant to have narration over the top of it), which explains the largely benign instrument choices. Also of note is that I’ve had no choice but to cut down the MIDI track because the mp3/ogg versions use some unorthodox instruments that don’t translate into MIDI. Finally, “Deeper” also uses an all-new guitar soundfont, which I think works well in this context.

And yes – more new music and additional “remasters” are on the way!

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

Music: A Taste of What’s to Come

I’m quite excited about this post.

Finally – after YEARS of avoidance – I have started taking the time to properly arrange and master the music available on this site.  This is a rather involved process; it involves hours of soundfont hunting, instrument tweaking, checking and re-checking levels, normalizing and compressing, and any number of smaller steps in-between depending on the particular song.  Because this process is so involved, I’ve failed to set aside the proper time for it, instead choosing to make my music available in various states of “almost finished.”

But no longer.

Here – for your listening pleasure – are two tracks familiar to anyone who has frequented the site in recent years… only they’ve been given proper treatment (meaning they sound a bajillion times better than previous versions):

Aerith’s Theme (Piano Solo) – MIDI (8kb)

Aerith’s Theme (Piano Solo) – mp3 (5.8mb)

Aerith’s Theme (Piano Solo) – ogg (4.2mb)

Retribution – MIDI (51kb)

Retribution – mp3 (6.1mb)

Retribution – ogg (5.0mb)

mp3s are available as high-quality VBR encodings (220-260kbps), with the ogg versions roughly equivalent.  Unlike previous versions of these tracks, proper compression and normalizing means each song will fit nicely into any playlist, with each track playing at a proper, standard volume.

I’m particularly happy with the way Aerith’s Theme turned out.   The new version uses a carefully tuned Steinway-based soundfont, and I’ve finally put my excellent Audigy2 ZS to use in getting the envelope hold, decay, and release working as it should.  The track sounds quite good considering it was recorded over MIDI from a 20-year-old keyboard.

Retribution sounds fairly similar to its original version in terms of actual instrumentation.  Some of the more grating tracks have been toned down, and I’ve swapped the piano for a celesta (it meshes better with the other instruments IMO).  Repetition on the percussion track has been cut down, and I’ve finally solved the problem of static on the loud sections.

Many additional, minor changes have gone into the remastering of these tracks, and I’m very pleased with how they’ve turned out.

Every song on the site will be getting similar treatment in the coming weeks, and every track will eventually be released in both mp3 and ogg versions (as well as the original MIDI when applicable).  I debated supplying FLAC versions as well, but the filesize simply isn’t practical.  Additionally, since these are not “live” productions, the extra “quality” FLAC affords really isn’t worth the extra time it requires.

If you have any feedback, do let me know.  Otherwise, enjoy music that is finally getting the treatment it deserves!

(And as always, all original music on this site has been released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License – so send copies to all your friends!  :)

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

On Writing

I’ve been asked by a number of people how progress is coming on my latest project, and it seems I never have a very exciting answer.

Until now, that is.  I’ve decided to finally compile my entire sordid story here, in one central place, to save myself having to relate it multiple times.  (Plus, this way I can make all my embellishments official!  Haha!)

I’d be lying if I said I’d always dreamed of being a writer.  Certainly I’ve always enjoyed writing, but as a kid I had any number of career goals (astronaut, president, film composer, NBA all-star, the list goes on…).

This isn’t to say I didn’t write a lot, because I did.  The problem was this: early on in an American male’s life, he learns that skills associated with reading and writing aren’t exactly…”cool.”  In 5th grade I won the school spelling bee and almost started crying – half from embarrassment, half from excitement.  In 6th grade I let my mom talk me into entering a poem in the “Reflections” contest, and the poem went on to win the school competition, district competition, and regional competition.  (I still have the trophy in my office.)  But poem-writing is not exactly among the coolest things a 6th-grade boy can do, and when I was told I had to read my award-winning poem in front of the school I wanted to die…especially because the poem took almost ten minutes to read (it was an epic poem, of course).

Based on input from my wonderful 6th-grade peers – most of whom are probably in jail now – I made the mistaken assumption that writing poetry was not among the list of skills that I should lay claim to.  Loogie-hocking, foreign curse word repertoire, and humorous names for human anatomy were much more in vogue at the time, so I didn’t pursue creative writing much throughout junior high and my freshman year of high school.

By 10th grade I had matured (slightly) and I think I finally realized that popular opinion among my peers was useless when it came to assessing career skills.  Not coincidentally, I also started work on my first video game project – what would be the first of several.

It was in 10th grade that I was first introduced to the RPG genre of video games and Final Fantasy 7 in particular.  If you’ve never played a Final Fantasy game, I pity you.  The name is a bit silly, but the game itself is a brilliant accomplishment on every level.  FF7 tells an intricate story of life and death through the age-old mechanism of epic conflict between good and evil, but it does so in an interactive medium that is hard to describe.  The artwork is beautiful, the music transcendent, and even the gameplay is a phenomenal balance between simplicity and strategy.  The game – though 12 years old – continues to inspire fan art, spin-off games, even full-length films, and while none of these comes close to the original, all are welcome tributes to what may be the most influential RPG in history.

FF7 was inspirational to my 10th grade mind on a multitude of levels.  I am still amazed at the way that video games (well-made ones, mind you) are capable of blending the visual and aural arts with interactive storytelling.  Games are a peerless medium, one too often used to less than its full potential.

But that is another topic for another day.

As a fairly accomplished musician and a closet writer, I remember the epiphany that accompanied my first play-through of Final Fantasy 7: here was a medium where I could combine a love of good music with a desire to tell complex and engaging stories, all through a medium made possible by my growing interest in computer programming.  It was then that I resolved to someday create a video game that would do for others what FF7 did for me: awe, inspire, and entertain.

Unfortunately, creating a complex story-driven video game is not well-suited to being done in the spare time of a high school student.  To combat this, I tried assembling online teams to help me on my path to world video game domination, but surprisingly people weren’t very reliable while working for free.

Imagine that.  :)

Years passed, and video game project after video game project slipped out of my grasp.  I tried every combination of local teams, international teams, professionals, amateurs, hobbyists, men, women, adults, teens – and never could I assemble the right mix of people to make my dream video game.

The problems with these various approaches are obvious now, in retrospect.  I suppose I was a bit of a narcissist in my leadership endeavours.  I thought that my perception of the ideal game story, score, artwork and design was clearly best, and that undoubtedly hampered my ability to work in a team environment.  I also had a bad knack for getting people really excited about these projects, recruiting tons of participants, only to realize I had no idea how to run a project of that size and scope.

I also realize now why there are so few well-made video games.  Coordinating the logistics of production with a vision of what makes a great game is an unimaginably difficult task, and those who do it are truly remarkable individuals/teams/companies.

Anyway, during my years of attempted video game production I amassed a number of meaningful souvenirs.  One of my favorites is the free collection of original music now available on this site.  There aren’t many places online where you can find 2+ hours of quality original music available for download – especially places that allow you to download, copy, and distribute that music without legal entanglements.

Another souvenir is the thousands of lines of free programming resources also available on this site.  It’s no coincidence that most of my programming tutorials and examples are game-related – after all, most of these examples stem from video game projects of varying scope and size.  I have (literally) hundreds more examples and tidbits lying around, and I hope to someday get the bulk of these posted to this site.

Finally, perhaps the best souvenirs from the entire era are a collection of original stories that have never seen the world outside my hard drive.  Some of these stories are complete and almost ready for publication; others are mere frameworks around which a compelling novel could be wove.  I spent a weekend several years ago reading through my archives of original literature, and wow – I really think there is some great stuff there.  (Of course, this could just be my nostalgia speaking… :)

By no coincidence, this epiphany happened during my senior year of college.  I was less than a year from completing my degree in bioinformatics, and I was starting to have nagging doubts that a career in bioinformatics was right for me.  Deep down, I still dreamed of a career in media, something that I had decided against years before because of the logistics of making a decent living with a liberal arts degree.  (No offense intended to all you liberal arts majors out there – I’m sure there are tons of jobs for people with degrees in medieval literature analysis!)

And then it hit me – one doesn’t have to be an English major to be a successful writer.  Some of my favorite writers (Michael Crichton, Terry Brooks, William Forstchen) are guys with normal careers who turned their expertise and interests into brilliant and compelling storytelling. Michael Crichton in particular is a great example of this.

So I made the decision to finish my degree in bioinformatics, but under an important condition – that I would have my first novel written before I graduated.

I didn’t quite make that goal, but I was able to finish a complete draft by the end of September 2007 (I had graduated in April).  I immediately embarked on sending out my masterpiece to agents and publishers everywhere, hoping that one of them would sign me up and I could forgo having to commit to a so-called “real” job.

Thus began my first eye-opening experience (of several) related to professional writing.  Almost no agents responded to my queries, and those that did used form letters that meant nothing to me.

After several weeks of going about this, I finally received a reply from a small publishing house in the northeast.  To summarize it, the email read something like this:

Dear Tanner Helland,

Thanks for sending us the 20 pages of your manuscript.

I liked the prologue very much–the tone and the content–I wanted to read more and hoped the rest of the book would live up to it.  Unfortunately, it didn’t for me. . . I felt the setting was unrealistic, and it seems to me that fantasy only works in a setting where most of the details are realistic.

Please realize that any editorial judgement is idiosyncratic and that another editor might leap at your manuscript. Of course we wish you the best of luck in placing the book elsewhere and appreciate your letting us see it.

Sincerely…

To this day, I am extremely grateful for this simple email.  The advice was spot-on, and exactly what I needed to motivate a strong rewrite of the text.  Unfortunately, I had already submitted my manuscript to the first ever Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award competition, but that didn’t prevent me starting work on a much-needed revamp of what had been a hasty and somewhat ill-conceived first shot at a formal novel.

While I feverishly wrote and rewrote my novel (“v2.0” as I thought of it), the original manuscript progressed nicely through the ABNA contest.  It made the first cut (5,000 people) and then progressed through to the second round (~800 people).  As part of the semifinalist reward, I received a manuscript review from Publishers Weekly.  It read as follows (this is verbatim):

In this promising debut, clearly the first in an intended series, fifteen-year-old Teal and his family move to the city in hopes that doctors there can save his gravely ill father. Seeking refuge in the janitor’s closet from a bully, Teal and his friend Eddie discover a portal that leads to an underground labyrinth built by an alien race called the Zargansk. Soon, they are on the run from men in black suits determined to kill them. Sixteen-year-old Kyralee saves them, but her presence raises more questions than answers. Teal’s feelings for Kyralee weave through this action-packed narrative, reminding us that while he is humanity’s best hope against the Zargansk, he is still a typical ninth-grader. Though the novel doesn’t break any new ground in the genre, the fast pace and cool gadgetry is enough to keep the reader engaged and rooting for Teal and his friends to the very end. — manuscript review by Publishers Weekly, an independent organization

As part of the process, I was also entitled to received a short (and somewhat useless) review from an Amazon Top Reviewer:

Very well written, but just not my cup of tea, as I don’t care for science fiction stories. But the author has a good imagination and excellent writing style and I liked his use of dialogue – it was appropriate for the characters.

In addition to those two pieces of “formal” critique, I participated in “story swaps” with over 30 other writers – where I’d swap them a chapter of my book for a chapter of their book, and we’d trade comments.  That was an immensely useful process, and by the end of it I had a MUCH better idea of what my fledgling manuscript needed.

My manuscript didn’t progress beyond the semifinalist round of the ABNA contest (genre fiction in general faired very poorly – apparently the judges were interested primarily in literary fiction), but that was okay because I knew the story needed a serious overhaul in several regards.  One of my first orders of business was changing the POV from 3rd-person to 1st-person, a decision that I believe fits the tone and style of the story much better.  I also rewrote the entire first half of the book with a renewed focus on character and setting, striving hard to create the realistic world to which my first customized rejection letter alluded.

I also took into account the Publisher’s Weekly comment of “…the novel doesn’t break any new ground in the genre…” by working in some new ideas, things I had never seen before in middle-grade fiction.  I’m hoping these improved the overall novelty of the novel (sorry for the awkward wording).

This “v2.0” rewrite took almost as long as it had taken to write the book the first time, but I believe both I and the story were much better for the experience.

Once I had the novel at a point where I couldn’t stand to read through it another time, I cashed in my final prize from the Amazon contest (a free self-publishing contract with Amazon’s new CreateSpace service) and got myself a real printed copy of Teal, my first novel.  (You can pick up a copy yourself from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Teal-Zargansk-Wars-Book-1/dp/1434886956)  I mostly did this so I could see my name on the cover of a book – and it has admittedly been fun to hand out copies to friends on family – but I have always intended for Teal to be published properly, and that is where my story sits today.

Before continuing, I should mention that in the months since self-publishing I have come to realize that revising is a horribly addicting process.  I know now that the back cover of my self-published book has a typo (d’oh!), and there are a number of minor issues with the novel itself that I’m itching to change.  But if I continued to fiddle with the story, it wouldn’t serve much purpose.  I need to let Teal rest for awhile while it treads through its second round of horrible, painful, ultra-humbling query letters.

As much as I gripe, this second round of query letters has been much better than the first.  After two months of waiting, I received a full manuscript request from the top agent on my list (an expert with YA fiction, including – gasp – YA science fiction and fantasy!) and I am now trying to be as patient as possible as I wait to hear what he/she thinks.  (I’m keeping anonymous so he/she has a chance to review the manuscript fairly!)

While I would give my right arm (and maybe my left one too) to work with this particular agent, I realize now that writing is not about being published.  Writing is about doing what you love – about telling a story that only you can tell.  This is what all great writers have done, and if they are “published” then that’s just the icing on the cake.

Great icing, to be sure – but icing nonetheless.

I have already started work on a new novel totally unrelated to Teal.  This one is much less science-fiction, much more modern thriller.  My experience in bioinformatics should prove especially useful for this book, and you can bet I’ll post more about it as progress continues.

And that’s where my writing efforts are as of now.  Did I miss anything?

Finally, while I’m thinking about it I want to leave a short bit of advice to any would-be writers out there – something that I wish others had shared with me.

Get your first book done as quickly as possible.  Write as fast as you can possibly write, and don’t worry about anything but storytelling.  Dump that first story out of your brain and onto your computer/notebook ASAP.

Once that’s done, review your manuscript while it’s hot and make sure you are okay attaching your name to it.  Assuming you are, throw together query letters for any agent that might accept your manuscript and send ’em out like gangbusters.

It won’t take long before the rejection letters start pouring in.  In my case, about one agent in four actually responded with a form rejection.  None sent customized rejections until they had requested a manuscript.  The vast majority never responded at all.

Regardless of how this works for you, wait several weeks, and when it seems like the rejection letters have finally stopped, take a deep breath.

Then smile.

You’ve successfully survived your first round of rejection letters.  It’s painful – really painful – but at least there is a light at the end of your tunnel.  By now, you’ve had some time away from your novel.  You should have a good idea of what can be improved and what areas need the most help.  You’ve also survived the horrible pain of rejection letters – and best of all, you can shrug the majority of them off because you know you can do better.  Hopefully you’ve also gotten a good taste of what it takes to write a quality query letter, and you can keep that in the back of your mind as you work on revisions.

I think I made the mistake of placing too many hopes and dreams into the first version of my first novel.  I felt like I had gotten it to perfection, and that made the initial round of rejection letters more painful than they probably needed to be.  There’s something to be said for rushing a product out the door, then being able to blame the “rushed launch” for any problems that arise.

Is that horrible advice?  I hope not.  I wish I had known what query letters entailed before I started writing Teal.  I think that would have helped me a great deal.

I also could have used a greater sense of detachment from that first novel.  It would have allowed me to be a bit more severe in my trimming and rewriting, and then I think the entire revision process would have been much more seamless and streamlined.  As it stood, I was much too sensitive to properly revise the first draft, and it wasn’t until multiple readers pointed out the same problems that I finally relinquished and fixed some glaring flaws.  I hope I can spare you the trouble of having to experience the same.

At any rate, sorry for the enormity of this post, and I hope to have good news regarding Teal in the “near” future…

Get It While It’s Hot – the Complete TannerHelland.com Music Collection

For the first time ever, the complete TannerHelland.com music collection is available for download.  By downloading this one .zip file, you will have access to all 42 full-length songs currently available on this site.

Enjoy the music!

Download the Complete TannerHelland.com Music Collection (97mb)


Technical Specs

Number of songs: 42

Format: mp3 (192 kbps, stereo)

Running length: ~1 hour 20 minutes

Included songs: Aerith’s Theme (Piano Solo), Alagaesia and Eragon, A Memory Away, “Bloody Tears” Remix, Carol of the Bells (Ukranian Bell Carol), Clowns, Crossroads, Dark Knight, Defiance, Defiance v2, Deserve to be Loved, Destiny, DragonFyre’s White Knights Remix, Faith, Faith (Chase Remix), Faith (Love Remix), Familiar Roads, Fate, Find You, Find You (March Remix), From Here, Halls of Despair, Hidden Tears, Home, King of the Desert, Leaving Millie, Leaving Millie (Live), Lost Islands, March of the Zargansk, Nevermore, Now or Never, Ominosity, Purgatory’s Mansion, Reign of Anarchy, Remember, Retribution, Surreptitious, The Haunting, The Journey (Kroc’s Theme), Tiberian National Anthem, Unknown, Wild Waters Theme Song

Creative Commons License

All songs in this collection are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License unless otherwise noted.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!

Song: Defiance – REMIXED

Listen online:last.fm

Download song: mp3 Ogg MIDI

What better way to release some new music than this – a remix of one of my favorite rock themes.  Video game battle themes have moved away from orchestral themes in recent years, opting instead to use a lot more guitars and drums.

Thus we have the newly remixed Defiance.  Soundfonts have been used to render the entire song, and a new intro lends itself more to classic RPG boss battle themes.  The end of the song has also been remixed, including more than 60 seconds of new material.  This remix originally appeared in the TGP/TLA project of 2000-2001, but I’ve never released it online.

So here you go!  Enjoy the new tune, and if you’d like to compare it to its predecessor, the old Defiance theme is available here:

http://www.tannerhelland.com/26/defiance/

Creative Commons License

"Defiance - REMIXED" by Tanner Helland is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be obtained here.

This site - and its many free downloads - are 100% funded by donations. Please consider a small contribution to fund server costs and to help me support my family. Even $1.00 helps. Thank you!